B to C and E to F

05 April 2017 Print

This is my technique for learning the notes on the fretboard.

First, check out Major Scale Formula. This gives you the letters that we use in music, and from there the C Major Scale, and from there, the Major Scale Formula.

It looks like this:

  • T
  • T
  • sT
  • T
  • T
  • T
  • sT

A Tone (T) is 2 frets.

A semi-Tone (sT) is 1 fret.

With the C Major Scale applied:

  • C
  • T
  • D
  • T
  • E
  • sT
  • F
  • T
  • G
  • T
  • A
  • T
  • B
  • sT
  • C

All the notes are a Tone apart except for B to C, and E to F.

So, on the fretboard, start on an open string, E for example, find the notes, in order, from the list above. The Fretboard Notes diagram willl help you.

No matter which note you are on, all you have to think is what you are on and where you will go next, for example:

I am on C, I will then move up to D.

C to D is NOT B to C.

C to D is NOT E to F.

Therefore it is a Tone away.

I am now on D, I will then move up to E.

D to E is NOT B to C.

D to E is NOT E to F.

Therefore it is a Tone away.

I am now on E, I will then move up to F.

E to F is NOT B to C.

E to F IS E to F.

Therefore it is a semi-Tone away.

You keep on doing this until you have used all the letters. This way you start and end with the same letter. An octave. You should be at the 12th fret.

Want to make it difficult?

Try it backwards i..e E to D etc

When to Use This

 

When you are learning a riff, or solo etc, you can use this technique to know what you ar eplaying.

Remember to start from the open strings, or if going backwards start from the 12th fret.

If you get good at it backwards you can save a LOT of time.

Imagine you are playing a note on the 10th fret on the B string.

What is it?

Well, start from the 12th fret, which would be B.

Before B is A.

B to A is NOT B to C.

B to A is NOT E to F.

Therefore it is a Tone away.

You are playing A.